Eligibility

The summer courses below are open to college undergraduates, graduate students and post-baccalaureates. These courses are not open to high school students.

    Course Load

    Students interested in identifying a research independent study project should email gwendy.womble@duke.edu

    Dates

    Please check DukeHub for individual course dates. 

    TUITION

    Summer 2020 tuition rates can be found on Duke's Summer session website  

    Online Courses - Summer 2020, Term 1

    Due to COVID-19, all in-person classes are being moved to a virtual format until further notice. The courses below are available for registration in DukeHub. 

    BIOLOGY 273LA MARINE ECOLOGY  - ONLINE COURSE 

     

    • Instructor: Brian Silliman
    • Curriculum Code: NS, R, W
    • Credit: 1.0 course (4 semester hours)
    • Course Travel?: No 
    • Cross Listing: ENVIRON 273LA; EOS 374LA

    Prerequisites: AP biology, introductory biology or instructor consent

    Factors that influence the distribution, abundance, and diversity of marine organisms. Course structure integrates lectures, field excursions, lab exercises and an independent project. Lecture topics include physical characteristics of marine systems, adaptation to environment, species interactions, biogeography, larval recruitment, and biodiversity and conservation of communities found in rocky shores, tidal flats, beaches, marshes, mangrove, coral reefs, and subtidal areas.

     

    ENVIRON 390 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSES OF MARINE AND COASTAL DRONE DATA - ONLINE COURSE 

    Provides students an in-depth exposure to the latest methods of drone data applications for coastal and marine applications. These multidisciplinary applications range from geomorphic/habitat change detection to ecological measurements. Students will gain experience in quantitative software workflows for analyzing drone imagery products and the associated statistical techniques for hypothesis testing with drone-based data products.

    • Instructor: Justin Ridge 
    • Curriculum Code: N/A
    • Course Travel: No
    • Prerequisite: none

    CHEMISTRY 201DLA. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I - ONLINE COURSE 

    • Instructor: Dr. Chris Roy

    • Curriculum Code: NS, STS
    • Course Travel?: No
    • Prerequisites: Prerequisite: Chemistry 101DL, or 110DL, or 21

    The structures and reactions of the compounds of carbon and the impact of selected organic compounds on society. Laboratory: techniques of separation, organic reactions and preparations, and systematic identification of compounds by their spectral and chemical properties. 

    MATH 212A. MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS - ONLINE COURSE 

    • Instructor: Bray
    • Curriculum Code: QS
    • Credit: 1.0 course
    • Course Travel?: No
    • Prerequisite: Mathematics 22, 112L, 122, or 122L.

    Partial differentiation, multiple integrals, and topics in differential and integral vector calculus, including Green's theorem, the divergence theorem, and Stokes's theorem. Not open to students who have taken Mathematics 202 or 222.

     

    BIOLOGY 278LA. COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY OF MARINE ANIMALS - ONLINE COURSE 

    • Instructors: Drs. Jason Somarelli & Andreas Fahlman
    • Curriculum Code: NS, R, W
    • Credit: 1.0 course (4 semester hours)
    • Course Travel?: No
    • Cross Listing: ENVIRON 278LA
    • Prerequisites: AP biology, introductory biology, or consent of the instructor, and introductory chemistry.

    Physiology of marine animals with emphasis on comparisons between marine vertebrates and humans. Focus on physiological processes including gas exchange, circulation, osmoregulation, metabolism, thermoregulation, endocrine, neural control and sensory systems. Lectures and laboratories illustrate the methodology, analysis techniques, and written reporting of physiological research.)

    This course fulfills the structure/function requirement for Biology majors and the Organismal Structure/Function requirement for Environmental Science majors (BS) and the marine science section for Environmental Science and Policy Majors (AB). 

    Additional Notes

    The summer course will focus on the molecular genetics and physiology of marine animals with emphasis on comparisons between marine vertebrates and humans. Focus on physiological processes including gas exchange, circulation, osmoregulation, metabolism, thermoregulation, endocrine, neural control and sensory systems and their underlying genetics, including gene structure across species, gene gains and losses, and molecular adaptation to the marine environment. Lectures and laboratories illustrate the methodology, analysis techniques, and written reporting of molecular biology and physiological research.

    PHY 141LA. GENERAL PHYSICS - ONLINE COURSE 

    • Instructors: Brown (summer) 
    • Curriculum Code: NS, QS
    • Credit: 1.0 course (4 credit/semester hours)
    • Course Travel?: No
    • Prerequisites: One year of college calculus (or equivalent) such as Math 105L, 106L, or 21. Math 122 recommended.

    First part of a two-semester, calculus-based, physics survey course for students planning study in medicine or the life sciences. Topics: kinematics, dynamics, systems of particles, conservation laws, statics, gravitation, fluids, oscillations, mechanical waves, sound, thermal physics, laws of thermodynamics. For credit, enrollment in Physics 141L and a lab/recitation (Physics 141L9, 141D) section required. Students planning to major in physics should enroll in Physics 161L, 162L in their freshman year. Closed to students having credit for Physics 151L, 153L, or 161L.

     

    STATS 101A. DATA ANALYSIS AND STATISTICAL INFERENCE - ONLINE COURSE 

    • Instructor: Kelly Moran
    • Curriculum Code: QS, R, STS
    • Credit: 1.0 course (4 credit hours)
    • Course Travel?: No

    Introduction to statistics as a science of understanding and analyzing data. Themes include data collection, exploratory analysis, inference, and modeling. Focus on principles underlying quantitative research in social sciences, humanities, and public policy. Research projects teach the process of scientific discovery and synthesis and critical evaluation of research and statistical arguments. Readings give perspective on why in 1950, S. Wilks said "Statistical thinking will one day be as necessary a qualification for efficient citizenship as the ability to read and write." See department website for placement information. Not open to students with credit for Statistics 102 or higher.

     

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    Questions?

    For help with undergraduate course registration, email gwendolyn.womble@duke.edu.