Eligibility

Summer courses are open to college undergraduates, graduate students and post-baccalaureates. These courses are not open to high school students.

Dates

For summer term start/end dates for 4-week and 6-week courses, see the Marine Lab Academic Calendar.

Tuition 

Summer 2020 tuition rates can be found on Duke's Summer session website.  

Enrollment

Enrollment for Duke and and visiting college students is available on the Duke Summer Session website

Online Courses - Summer 2020, Term 2

Due to COVID-19, all in-person classes are being moved to a virtual format until further notice. 

BIOLOGY 270A. / ENVIRON 709A CONSERVATION BIOLOGY AND POLICY

  • Instructor: Rachel Gittman
  • Curriculum Code: EI, NS, STS, W
  • Credit:1.0 course
  • Course Travel?: No
  • Cross Listing: ENVIRON 270A
  • Prerequisites: Introductory biology; suggested: a policy and/or introductory ecology course.

Introduction to the key concepts of ecology and policy relevant to conservation issues at the population to ecosystems level. Focus on the origin and maintenance of biodiversity and conservation applications from both the biology and policy perspectives (for example, endangered species, aquaculture, captive breeding, reserve design, habitat fragmentation, ecosystem restoration/rehabilitation).

ENVIRON 335A / ENVIRON 735A DRONES IN MARINE BIOLOGY, ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION

  • Instructor: David William Johnston
  • Curriculum Code: NS, STS
  • Credit:1.0 course (3 credit/semester hours)
  • Course Travel?: No
  • Cross Listing: BIO 335A

Includes a full overview of past and emerging applications for ecology and biology of marine species and coastal habitats with in-depth discussion on future of drone applications in coastal biological and ecological research. Comprehensive exploration of current drone technologies, including detection limits of target species, payload selection, operational procedures aeronautical concepts, rules and regulations, safety, mission planning, aircraft design, maintenance, data collection, management and analysis. Biological and technical lab components tailored to student interests:

Active participation in megafaunal or environmental research and data analysis. Building, operating and maintaining aircraft, programming for manual and autonomous flight.

The use of unoccupied aircraft systems (UAS) is changing how marine scientists collect data on animals and the environments they inhabit.  This course introduces students to the basics of using UAS in marine environments, presenting examples of existing and emerging applications, detailing the types of sensors used for marine applications, describes the sampling complexities of the marine environment, and provides and overview of typical workflows and data management. Details on regulatory and permitting requirements to fly UAS and legally and safely are also covered. The lab portion of the course will focus on basic aeronautics, flight planning and simulations, and the design, assembly, operation and maintenance of unoccupied aerial vehicles.

Check out Duke's Unoccoupied Aircraft Facility website : http://superpod.ml.duke.edu/uas/

BIOLOGY 375LA / ENVIRON 777LA BIOLOGY AND CONSERVATION OF SEA TURTLES

  • Instructors: Wendy Dow Piniak, Matthew Godfrey
  • Curriculum Code: NS, STS
  • Credit:1.0 course (4 credit/semester hours)
  • Course Travel?: No
  • Cross Listing: Environment 375LA.
  • Prerequisites: Introductory Biology or Environmental Science (AP/IB credit counts toward this prerequisite)

Essential biology of sea turtles (evolution, anatomy, physiology, behavior, life history, population dynamics) and their conservation needs; emphasis on their role in marine ecosystem structure and function. Basic ecological concepts integrated with related topics including the conservation and management of endangered species, the contributions of technology to the management of migratory marine species, the role of research in national and international law and policy, and the veterinary aspects of conservation. Includes laboratory and field experience with animals and with their habitat requirements.

BIOLOGY 377L BIODIVERSITY OF MARINE INVERTEBRATES

An introduction to the biodiversity represented by major marine invertebrate groups, with emphasis on the diversity of body forms and behaviors and on anatomical structures and functions. Field trips primarily by boat allow students to explore invertebrates characteristic of a variety of coastal habitats in North Carolina, including mud flats, sandy beaches, salt marshes, oyster reefs, piers and docks, and the water column. Live invertebrates maintained in the laboratory serve as models for detailed study of form and function.

BIOLOGY 376A / ENVIRON 776A. MARINE MAMMALS

  • Instructor: Reny Tyson Moore
  • Curriculum Code: NS, R, STS
  • Credit:1.0 course, 4 credit/semester hours
  • Course Travel?: No
  • Cross Listing: Environment 376A.
  • Prerequisites: Introductory Biology or Environmental Science (AP/IB credit counts toward this prerequisite)

The biology of cetaceans, pinnipeds, sirenians, sea otters. Topics covered include the diversity, evolution, ecology, and behavior of marine mammals and their interactions with humans. Detailed consideration given to the adaptations that allow these mammals to live in the sea. Evaluation of the scientific, ethical, and aesthetic factors influencing societal attitudes toward these animals and of their conservation management in light of domestic legislation and international treaties. Laboratory and field exercises consider social organization, behavior, ecology, communication, and anatomy of local bottlenose dolphins.

This field-intensive course covers the biology, management and conservation of marine mammals. Detailed consideration is given to adaptation, ecology and conservation. Laboratory and field exercises address behavior, ecology, and communication of local populations of marine mammal and seabirds. The course is suitable for both undergraduate and graduate students.

ENVIRON 390 DATABASE FOR COMPARATIVE MOLECULAR GENETICS, ANATOMY, AND PHYSIOLOGY

Decades of research in molecular biology and physiology has produced a treasure trove of data that illuminate how different cell types and organ systems respond to
environmental stimuli across species. Yet, despite this wealth of knowledge, access to
this incredible resource is hampered by the lack of a central database in which to access and integrate these data sets. In this problem- and team-based on-line course, we will work with students as a virtual team to create and publish a comparative molecular,
anatomical and physiological data base.

This project/team-based course could include students from different backgrounds, i.e.
science, and arts, and different levels, i.e. undergraduate and graduate, to work together
to create a database and web design that could result in a scientific publication and also a database accessible to the public.

ENVIRON/PUBPOL 390 REGULATING THE OCEANS 

  • Instructor: Steve Roady
  • Curriculum Codes: EI, SS, W

This is an applied course in understanding how humans endeavor to regulate the oceans. It examines how law, the court system, and policies drive management of ocean and coastal resources. Building on this foundation, the course will explore how COVID-19 has affected
ocean law, policy and management. For example, questions we may discuss include:

1. What happened to federal fisheries management during the pandemic? Were observers still deployed on fishing vessels? How may have this affected fish stock health?

2. Did the pandemic affect marine mammal stranding response, funding, or other marine mammal science and management required under the Marine Mammal Protection Act?

3. Were there lapses in offshore energy compliance with the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, such as with oil and gas safety in the Gulf of Mexico?
4. Did the oceans grow quieter during the pandemic? If so, how did this reduction in ocean noise affect marine mammals?

Research Independent Study - Schedule Varies

BIOLOGY 293. RESEARCH INDEPENDENT STUDY

  • Curriculum Code:R
  • Credit:1.0 course (3 semester hours)
  • Course Travel?:No

Individual research in a field of special interest, under the supervision of a faculty member, the major product of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Open to all qualified students with consent of supervising instructor and director of undergraduate studies. May be repeated. Continued in Biology 493.

BIOLOGY 493A. RESEARCH INDEPENDENT STUDY

  • Curriculum Code: R
  • Credit:1.0 course (3 semester hours)
  • Course Travel?:No

Continuation of Biology 293.

ENVIRON 393A. / EOS 393A. RESEARCH INDEPENDENT STUDY

  • Curriculum Code: R
  • Credit: 1.0 course (3 semester hours)
  • Course Travel?: No

Individual research in a field of special interest, under the supervision of a faculty member, the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Open to students with approval of a research advisor at the Marine Lab. Students will be given a permission number after consent from the faculty who will serve as the student's research advisor.

ENVIRON 394A. RESEARCH INDEPENDENT STUDY

  • Curriculum Code: R
  • Credit: 1.0 course (3 semester hours)
  • Course Travel?: No

Individual research in a field of special interest, under the supervision of a faculty member, the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Open to students with approval of a research advisor at the Marine Lab. Students will be given a permission number after consent from the faculty who will serve as the student's research advisor. Continuation of ENVIRON 393A. 

 

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    Questions?

    For help with undergraduate course registration, email gwendy.womble@duke.edu.