Eligibility

The summer courses below are open to college undergraduates, graduate students and post-baccalaureates. These courses are not open to high school students.

    Course Load

    Students interested in identifying a research independent study project should email gwendy.womble@duke.edu

    Dates

    May 12 - June 24, 2021

    TUITION

    Summer 2021 tuition rates can be found on Duke's Summer session website  

    Summer 2021, Term 1

    November 2020 update: The list of courses below are scheduled to be offered in Summer 2021. Updates will be available in early December ahead of summer registration on February 15, 2021. 

     

    BIOLOGY 201 GATEWAY TO BIOLOGY: MOLECULAR BIOLOGY 

    • Instructor: Tom Schultz
    • Curriculum Codes: NS, STS
    • Credit: 1.0 course (4 semester hours)
    • Course Travel: No

    Non-laboratory version of Biology 201L. Introduces major concepts in biology through the lens of molecular biology. Molecular mechanisms that comprise the Central Dogma and variants. DNA structure and function, replication, transcription, and translation. Protein synthesis, folding, structure and function. Supporting topics related to the structure of cells, metabolism and energetics. Integration of physical and quantitative principles to molecular biology. Relevance to human diseases and the biotechnology industry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 21, 21L, 101DL, 110DL, or 201DL. Not open to students who have taken Biology 201L/201LA. 

    BIOLOGY 273LA. MARINE ECOLOGY  

    • Instructor: Brian Silliman
    • Curriculum Code: NS, R, W
    • Credit: 1.0 course (4 semester hours)
    • Course Travel?: No 
    • Cross Listing: ENVIRON 273LA; EOS 374LA

    Prerequisites: AP biology, introductory biology or instructor consent

    Factors that influence the distribution, abundance, and diversity of marine organisms. Course structure integrates lectures, field excursions, lab exercises and an independent project. Lecture topics include physical characteristics of marine systems, adaptation to environment, species interactions, biogeography, larval recruitment, and biodiversity and conservation of communities found in rocky shores, tidal flats, beaches, marshes, mangrove, coral reefs, and subtidal areas.

    CHEMISTRY 201DLA. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I 

    • Instructor: Dr. Chris Roy

    • Curriculum Code: NS, STS
    • Course Travel?: No
    • Prerequisites: Chemistry 101DL, or 110DL, or 21

    The structures and reactions of the compounds of carbon and the impact of selected organic compounds on society. Laboratory: techniques of separation, organic reactions and preparations, and systematic identification of compounds by their spectral and chemical properties. 

    ENG LISH 390A VISUAL MEDIA, SCIENCE & NATURE 

    • Instructor: Burns
    • Curriculum Codes: PENDING REVIEW: ALP, STS, EI, W
    • Course Travel: No

    This class examines how visual media—climate models, nature films, photography—frame our perceptions of the environment. From BBC’s Blue Planet to NASA’s satellite images, our course will approach scientific media including drone photography, satellite images, and climate graphs as cultural objects that engage historical and ethical discourses of nature and the human. Drawing upon visual, media, and literary theory, we will consider how these visions of the environment have changed over time, mediating how we imagine and, thus, understand the world around us. Along the way, we will ask such fundamental questions as, what is climate change and how do we understand it? How can we draw upon visual media to imagine alternate, more resilient futures?  

    Students will have the opportunity to create their own visual media. Through a photography or mixed-media portfolio, students will draw upon personal experiences and field trips to visually articulate their own “picture of nature” that opens up conversations between land and sea, science and art, and the personal and the planetary. In this journey to trace the symbiotic relationship among art, literature, and science, our course will introduce students to the field of the environmental humanities and help them gain a solid foundation in visual media theory.   

    BIOLOGY 278LA./ENVIRON 778LA COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY OF MARINE ANIMALS 

    • Instructors: Drs. Jason Somarelli & Andreas Fahlman
    • Curriculum Code: NS, R, W
    • Credit: 1.0 course (4 semester hours)
    • Course Travel?: No
    • Cross Listing: ENVIRON 278LA
    • Prerequisites: AP biology, introductory biology, or consent of the instructor, and introductory chemistry.

    Physiology of marine animals with emphasis on comparisons between marine vertebrates and humans. Focus on physiological processes including gas exchange, circulation, osmoregulation, metabolism, thermoregulation, endocrine, neural control and sensory systems. Lectures and laboratories illustrate the methodology, analysis techniques, and written reporting of physiological research.)

    This course fulfills the structure/function requirement for Biology majors and the Organismal Structure/Function requirement for Environmental Science majors (BS) and the marine science section for Environmental Science and Policy Majors (AB). 

    Additional Notes

    The summer course will focus on the molecular genetics and physiology of marine animals with emphasis on comparisons between marine vertebrates and humans. Focus on physiological processes including gas exchange, circulation, osmoregulation, metabolism, thermoregulation, endocrine, neural control and sensory systems and their underlying genetics, including gene structure across species, gene gains and losses, and molecular adaptation to the marine environment. Lectures and laboratories illustrate the methodology, analysis techniques, and written reporting of molecular biology and physiological research.

     

    Quick Links

    Questions?

    For help with undergraduate course registration, email gwendolyn.womble@duke.edu.