BIOLOGY 273LA. Marine Ecology (Great Barrier Reef, Australia)

Instructor: Curriculum Code:
NS
R
W
Credit:
1.0 course (4 credit/semester hours)
Course Travel?:
Yes
Cross Listing:
ENVIRON 273LA, EOS 374LA
Prerequisites:

AP Biology or introductory biology or consent of instructor

NEW!**This course fulfills the Organismal Diversity requirement for Duke Biology majors**
Factors that influence the distribution, abundance, and diversity of marine organisms. Course structure integrates lectures, field excursions, lab exercises and an independent project. Lecture topics include physical characteristics of marine systems, adaptation to environment, species interactions, biogeography, larval recruitment, and biodiversity and conservation of communities found in rocky shores, tidal flats, beaches, marshes, mangrove, coral reefs, and subtidal areas.

Marine Ecology in the spring includes a travel component to Heron Island, Australia (2019)  for approximately 16 days (details TBA: approximately March 17- April 3, 2019). Contact Katie.Wood@duke.edu with questions.  

Course Fee: $3,540 (covers in country transportation and most meals - does not include airfare) 


2019 Tentative Itinerary (subject to change)

Instructor: Dr. Brian Silliman; email: Brian.Silliman@Duke.edu

Webpage: http://sillimanlab.com/

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor

Packing List: view list here

Course Description:
This course is designed to introduce students to invertebrate animals, fish, vascular plants, and micro and macroalgae found in the marine and terrestrial environments of the Great Barrier Reef and to study their adaptations and interactions in the context of community ecology. Lectures and labs will be focused on all major invertebrate phyla including: crustacea, echinoderms, annelids, cnidaria, molluscs and porifera, as well as plants, fish families, and ecology of major habitats.. We will encounter these major groups while snorkeling shallow water environments (SCUBA certification is not required.)  Fieldwork will be the main activity and attention will be given to collection methodology, identification, sampling techniques, research design and other useful field skills.

Lectures, lab work, quizzes, journal writing and readings will supplement the field work, as will an independent research project for 5 days in the shallow waters surrounding the island of Heron Island, Australia. These reefs are very rich, quite accessible and easily studied.

Over the course, we will visit 12 or more ecological habitats (e.g. temperate and tropical seagrasses, salt marshes, mangroves, coral reefs, sand flats, mud flats, rocky shores, scrub pine, coral reefs) on the island and to observe the organisms in situ. Following the site visits, there will be discussions about adaptations seen in the field and the significance of these adaptations in the context of morphology, anatomy, physiology, behavior, development and ecology.  Another major focus of the course is on the variety of biological interactions that occur on the reefs and their ecological/evolutionary implications.

A typical day's work may involve visits to two field locations, 1-2 lectures and laboratory time.

Location:

Course time will be split between Duke University Marine Lab and Heron Island, an island on the barrier reef in Australia. The class will take place at the Heron Island University of Queensland field station.  Facilities include labs with running sea water, dormitories, dining hall, and library. Food and lodging are provided at the station. Clear water and spectacular field sites with abundant, shore-accessible coral reefs for serious study are the major attractions. Accommodations at the Center are rustic but quite adequate.

Course Objectives:

1. Teach students through hands-on learning, intensive field experiments, and lectures the importance of Creativity, Motivation, Patience, Persistence, and Observation in Science and Marine Ecology. 

2. Provide students field experience at the beginning of their education. 

3. Empower students to do science and think independently over a short period.

4. Teach students to be synthesizers and critical thinkers.

5. Provide students experience doing science from the beginning to the end. 

7. Teach students to convey effectively their scientific thoughts and analyses in writing and oral presentations. 

8. Empower students how to do Science and Ecology based on original observations in nature. 

9. Gain a broad understanding of the ecology and natural history of marine organisms processes on the Great Barrier Reef.

Lecture Topics, Dates, and Times:

Sunday, March 17th - Monday, March 18th:

  Travel to Brisbane

Tuesday, March. 19th:

9:00 – 12:00              Travel to Heron Island Ferry

1:00  - 3:00                Lectures: Porifera, Cnidaria (Brian)

3:00 – 5:00                Snorkel!

7:00-9:00                   Specis ID

Wednesday, March 20th

9:00 – 12:00              Lectures: “What is Science?”, Annelids (Brian)         

1200 – 1:00               Lunch

1:30 – 2:30                Lecture: Seagrasses and Algae (Stacy)

2:30 -  3:30                Lecture: Crustacea (Joe)

3:30 - 5:00                 Journal time

7:00 – 10:00              Study

Thursday, March 21th

9:00 – 12:00              Study

12:00 – 1:00              Lunch

1:00 – 3:00                Quiz 1 (Lectures)

Friday, March 22th

9:00                            Turn in Quiz 2 questions for Readings

10:00 – 1:00              Quiz 2 (Readings)

1:00 - 2:00                 Snorkel

Saturday March 23th:

6:00 – 7:00              Breakfast

7:00 – 10:00              Bird Hike

12:00 – 1:00              Lunch

1:00 – 4:00                Arts and Crafts

5:00 – 6:00                Dinner

6:00 – 7:00                Lecture: Mangroves (Carter)

8:00 – 9:00                Journal

Sunday, March 24th:

8:00 – 9:00                Breakfast

9:00 – 12:00              Snorkel

12:00 – 1:00              Lunch

1:00 – 3:00                Snorkel

3:00 – 5:00                Journal Time

5:00 – 6:00                Dinner

7:00 - 8:00                Lecture: Physical Forcing (Brian)

8:00 – 9:00                Small Group Discussions

 

Monday March 25nd

6:00 – 7:00                Breakfast

7:00 – 10:00              Snorkel

12:00 – 1:00              Lunch

1:00 – 4:00                Snorkel

5:00 – 6:00                Dinner

6:00 – 7:00                Lecture: Climate Change and Reefs (Carter and Stacy)

8:00 – 9:00                Journal

Tuesday March 26th

7:00 – 8:00                Breakfast

8:00 – 11:00              Snorkel

12:00 – 1:00              Lunch

1:00  - 5:00                Long Hike or Local School Visit

5:00 – 6:00                Dinner

7:00 – 8:00                Lecture: Fish I (Brian)

Wednesday March 27th

6:00 – 7:00                Breakfast

7:00 – 10:00              Snorkel

12:00 – 1:00              Lunch

1:00 – 4:00                Snorkel

5:00 – 6:00                Dinner

6:00 – 7:00                Lecture: Predation on Shelled Molluscs (Brian)

8:00 – 9:00                Journal

Thursday, March 28th:

7:00 – 8:00                Breakfast

8:00 – 9:15                Lecture: Living Shorelines (Carter)

9:30 – 12:00             Seagrasses and Dock Snorkel

12:00 – 2:00              Lunch

2:00 – 5:00                Snorkel

6:00 – 7:00                Dinner

7:00 –– 10:00            Organism Review/ Discussions Lab; Work on logbooks

Friday, March 29th:

7:00 – 8:00                Breakfast

8:00 – 9:15                Lecture: Fish III (Brian)

9:15 – 12:00              Reef Snorkel

12:00 – 2:00              Lunch

1:30 - 4:30                 Reef Snorkel           

6:00 – 7:00                Dinner                       

7:00 – 10:00              Organism Review/ Discussions Lab; Work on logbooks

Saturday, March 30th:

7:00 – 8:00                Breakfast

8:00– 9:30                 Lecture: Fish Review (Brian)

9:30 – 12:00              Snorkel

12:00 - 1:30               Lunch           

2:00  - 5:30                Snorkel and Quiz 3 (Fish)

5:00 – 6:00                Dinner

6:00 – 7:00                Lecture: Coral Review (Stacy)                                        

7:00 – 10:00              Papers, Organism Review/ Discussions Lab; Journals

Sunday, March 31th:

7:00 – 8:00                Breakfast

8:00 – 9:00                Lecture: Coral Review (Stacy)    

9:00 – 12:00              Snorkel

12:00 – 1:00              Lunch on the road

1:00 – 5:30                Snorkel and Quiz 4 (Corals)

5:00 – 6:00                Dinner  

6:00 – 7:00                Introduction to Projects

7:00 – 10:00              Papers, Organism Review/ Discussions Lab; Journals

 

Monday, April 1st:

7:00 – 8:00                Breakfast

8:00 – 10:00              Lecture: Coral I and II (Brian)

10:00 – 12:00            Ind. Projects

12:00 – 1:00              Lunch Away

1:00 – 4:00                Ind. Projects

5:00- 6:00                  Dinner

7:00 – 10:00              Work on Logs

 

Tuesday, April 2nd:

7:00 – 8:00                Breakfast

8:00 – 9:30                Lecture: Echinoderms and Tunicates (Brian)

9:30 – 12:00              Ind.Projects

12:00 – 1:00              Lunch

2:00 – 5:00                Snorkel Reef

5:00 – 6:00                Dinner           

6:00 – 8:00                Meet with advisors  

 Wednesday, April 3rd:

7:00 – 8:00                Breakfast

8:00 - 9:00                 Lecture: Geology and History of Australia (Joe)

9:00 – 12:00              Ind.Projects

12:00 – 1:00              Lunch

2:00 – 5:30                Ind.Projects

6:00 – 7:00                Dinner

7:00 – 10:00              Meet with advisors, Papers, Logs

Thursday, April 4th:

7:00 – 8:00                Breakfast

12:00                          Depart to NC

April 6th:9:00-12:00                          Final Exam

GRADING:

Quizzes: 5 @ 5% each (5th is the Final)

Independent Projects: 25%

Logs: 30%

Final Exam: 20%

 

Course readings:

Readings will be provided to you and will be located online on Sakai.

 

 

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