Alex Robel

Alex Robel

Assistant Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology

T'10, BS Earth & Ocean Sciences; BA, Physics, minor in Math

Alex is currently an Assistant Professor in the School of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he leads the Ice & Climate group. Research in the group is focused on understanding how changes in climate leads to changes in the ice sheets and glaciers on Earth. The Ice & Climate group translates knowledge of how ice sheets behave to projections of future changes in global sea level by develop mathematical and numerical models of ice sheet melt and flow. As a native of Miami, Florida, Alex is deeply committed to cooperating with coastal communities to effectively plan and adapt to rising sea level and other coastal hazards.

Alex came to Georgia Tech after completing a double major in Earth and Ocean Sciences and Physics at Duke as an Angier B. Duke Scholar. While at Duke, he helped establish pSearch, a research-oriented pre-orientation program, that has helped launch dozens of Duke undergraduates onto a career path in scientific research. Alex went on to complete a PhD at Harvard in Earth and Planetary Sciences. During his PhD studies, he was an National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellow and National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow. Alex then spent three years as a postdoctoral fellow at the California Institute of Technology and the University of Chicago, as a NOAA Climate and Global Change Fellow.

"The warm and open environment of the Nicholas School was formative in my early development as a scientist. Both the scientific training and the willingness of faculty to welcome undergraduate students into their labs was critical to nurturing my love for science and bolstering my early career achievements. I would recommend a major in the Nicholas School to any Duke undergraduate with a passion for science and a desire to participate in the phenomenal research opportunities available at Duke."

Program Area

Undergraduate