EEP Prerequisites & Course Requirements

Start planning early to get the most out of your Environmental Economics & Policy program experience. Contact our Admissions Office (prospective students) or see Student Advising (admitted and current students) for more information. 
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PREREQUISITES

These are the courses you’ll need to complete before you start your degree program. See our Statement of Prerequisite Coursework for details. 

Prerequisites for All MEM Students

  1. Some previous training in the natural sciences or the social sciences related to the student’s area of interest.
  2. At least one semester of college calculus.
  3. A college statistics course that includes descriptive statistics, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, correlation, simple linear regression, and simple ANOVAs.

Additional Prerequisites for EEP Students

  1. One semester of college-level microeconomics or an introductory economics course with a focus on microeconomics. 

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COURSE REQUIREMENTS

The MEM degree requires a minimum of 48 credit hours. A typical EEP curriculum consists of the following components: 

  • Three courses/tutorials required for all MEM students (2 credit hours)
  • Four Core Courses (9 credit hours)
  • Three Major Electives (12 credit hours minimum)
  • Three Tools Courses (8 credit hours minimum)
  • Three Natural Science Electives (9 credit hours minimum)
  • Master’s Project (4-6 credit hours)
  • Additional electives as needed to meet the minimum requirement of 48 credit hours total

Choosing a Track The EEP program allows students to choose from two curriculum tracks. We can help you determine which track best aligns with your interests and career goals.

Environmental Policy and Analysis
This track emphasizes the development and implementation of environmental policy. Students in this track typically choose from courses offered at the Nicholas School, the Sanford School of Public Policy and Duke’s Political Science Department.

Environmental and Resource Economics
This track allows students to deepen their skills in the economic analysis of environmental management and policy. Students in this track typically choose from courses offered at the Nicholas School, the Sanford School of Public Policy and Duke’s Economics Department.

    Course Requirements for All MEM Students
    All MEM students must take the following courses:

    • ENVIRON 800 Professional Communications (1 credit hour)
    • ENVIRON 898.05 MP Seminar (1 credit to be awarded at the end of 4 semesters)
    • ENVIRON 899.05 Master’s Project (4 to 6 c.h.)

    Successful completion of online Introductory Master’s Project Tutorials is also a requirement. The tutorials offer information on various types of MPs and principles of research design.

    Course Requirements Specific to the EEP Program
    The EEP curriculum consists of core courses, major electives in the student’s chosen track, tools courses and natural science course. (See Example Courses below.)

    For most students, it is a good idea to select courses that allow you to acquire one or two “suites” of marketable skills. Example skill suites that seem to be marketable at present include benefit-cost analysis, application of geospatial analysis to policy problems, corporate environmental management, and management of particular types of land resources, such as biodiversity reserves, coastal zones and wetlands.

    Master’s Project
    Each MEM student must complete a Master’s Project. This project provides an opportunity to integrate your coursework and showcase your ability to use what you have learned at the Nicholas School to design and carry out a well-formulated and defensible analysis of a management-related problem. The Master’s Project may be done individually or in a group and typically culminates in a paper and presentation in the program’s final semester. The Master’s Project fulfills 4-6 credit hours. 

    Additional Electives
    Some students must take additional elective courses to fulfill the minimum 48-credit hour requirement for degree completion. We suggest taking additional courses that will help to round out your suite of marketable skills. 
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    EXAMPLE COURSES

    Courses supporting the EEP program are taught within the Nicholas School, at several other departments at Duke, and at UNC-Chapel Hill. This list of example courses is not exhaustive; see our Advising page for an up-do-date list of available courses.

    Core Courses

    All students must take the following four Core Courses for a total of 9 credit hours.

    • ENVIRON 520 & 521 Resource & Envir Econ I and II (3 credit hours total, fall)
    • ENVIRON 577 Environmental Politics (3 credit hours, spring)
    • ENVIRON 835 Environmental Law (3 credit hours, fall, Duke Law School)

    Major Electives
    Students select at least three elective courses from their chosen track for a total of 12 credit hours minimum. For each track, at least one of the Major Electives should come from a course listed or cross-listed under ENVIRON or ENRGYENV.

    At your advisor’s discretion, you may take 12 credit hours of tools (rather than 8-9) and only 9 credit hours of Major Electives (rather than 12) to fulfill program requirements.

    Environmental Policy and Analysis Track

    • ENVIRON 775 Ocean and Coastal Law and Policy
    • ENVIRON 850 Program Evaluation of Environmental Policies
    • ENVIRON 826 Global Environmental Politics
    • ENVIRON 563 Applying Economic Analysis for Environmental and Public Health
    • ENVIRON 868 (crosslisted as LAW 368) Natural Resources Law
    • ENVIRON 869 Integrated Case Studies: Environmental Law and Policy Clinic
    • ENVIRON 891 Topics in Environmental Regulation
    • ENVIRON 543S Water Cooperation & Conflict
    • ENVIRON 579S Collective Action
    • ENVIRON 755 Community Based Environmental Management
    • LAW 520 Climate Change and the Law
    • ENVIRON 855 (crosslisted as LAW 555) International Environmental Law
    • LAW 503 Sources of Environmental Law
    • ENVIRON 583S Energy and National Security
    • ENVIRON 725S Protected Areas, Tourism, and Development
    • ENVIRON 532 Evaluation of Public Expenditures
    • ENVIRON 659 Should I Eat Fish: Economics, Ecology and Health
    • ENVIRON 590.28 US Water Governance
    • ENVIRON 590.37 Sustainable Cities
    • ENVIRON 621 Water Resources Finance and Planning
    • ENVIRON 684 Politics of the Urbanized Environment
    • ENVIRON 590.36 Federal Fisheries Management
    • ENVIRON 590.86 Putting Ecosystem Service Markets Into Practice

    Environmental and Resource Economics Track

    • ENVIRON 752 Sustainability and Renewable Resource Economics
    • ENVIRON 531 Economic Analysis of Environmental Policies
    • ENVIRON 532 Evaluation of Public Expenditures
    • ENVIRON 850 Program Evaluation of Environmental Policies
    • ENVIRON 680 Economics of Forest Resources
    • ENVIRON 851S Environment and Development Economics
    • ENVIRON 563 Economic Analysis and Evaluation for Public Health and Environment
    • ENVIRON 717 Electric Power Markets
    • ENVIRON 635 Energy Economics & Policy
    • ENVIRON 538 Environmental Health Economics & Policy
    • ENVIRON 579S Collective Action
    • ENVIRON 563 Applying Economic Analysis for Environmental and Public Health
    • ENVIRON 659 Should I Eat Fish: Economics, Ecology and Health
    • ENVIRON 590.86 Putting Ecosystem Service Markets Into Practice
    • ENVIRON 829 Natural Resource Economics (Ph.D. Course, permission of instructor required)
    • ECON 601 Microeconomic Theory
    • PUBPOL 598 Economic Growth and Development Policy

    Tools Courses
    Students must complete at least three courses in quantitative or analytical methods for a total of 8 credit hours minimum.

    At your advisor’s discretion, you may take 12 credit hours of tools (rather than 8-9) and only 9 credit hours of Major Electives (rather than 12) to fulfill program requirements.

    All students are required to take ENVIRON 710 Applied Data Analysis for Envir. Sciences (3 credit hours, fall). For the other two courses, students may select from the following options:

    • ENVIRON 716L Energy Systems Modeling (3 c.h., fall)
    • ENVIRON 717 Electric Power Markets (3 c.h., spring)
    • ENVIRON 715 Understanding Energy Models & Modeling (1 credit hr, spring)
    • ENVIRON 638 Environmental Life Cycle Analysis (3 c.h., spring)
    • ENVIRON 755 Community Based Environmental Mgmt (3 credit hrs, fall)
    • ENVIRON 752 Sust. & Renewable Resource Econ. (3 c.h., spring)
    • ENVIRON 764 Applied Differential Equations in Envir. Sci. (3 c.h., fall)
    • ENVIRON 531 Economic Analysis of Environmental Policies (3 c.h., fall)
    • ENVIRON 532 Evaluation of Public Expenditures (3 c.h., fall)
    • ENVIRON 556 Environmental Conflict Resolution (3 c.h., spring)
    • ENVIRON 563 Economic Analysis & Evaluation (3 c.h., spring)
    • ENVIRON 635 Energy Economics (1.5 c.h., fall)
    • ENVIRON 850 Program Evaluation of Environ. Policies (3 c.h., spring)
    • ENVIRON 590.67 Participatory Techniques Env. Decisions (1 credit hour, fall)
    • ENVIRON 758 Applied Qualitative Research Methods (3 c.h., spring)
    • ENVIRON 621 Water Resources Finance and Planning (3 c.h., fall)
    • ENVIRON 832 Environmental Decision Analysis (3 c.h., spring)
    • ENVIRON 557 Social Science Surveys for Envir. Mgmt. (3 c.h., spring)
    • ENVIRON 559 Fundamentals of Geospatial Analysis (4 c.h., fall)
    • ENVIRON 852 Spatial Analysis in Ecology (3 c.h., fall)
    • ENVIRON 665 Bayesian Inference in Environment Models (3 c.h., fall)
    • ENVIRON 658 Qualitative Research Methods (3 c.h., fall)
    • ENVIRON 769 Hydrology Modeling for Water Quality and Quantity Assessment (3 c.h., fall)
    • ENVIRON 811 Sustainable Systems Analysis (3 c.h., fall)
    • ENVIRON 867L Satellite Remote Sensing for Environmental Analysis (3 c.h., fall)
    • ENVIRON 859 Advanced Geospatial Analysis (3 c.h., fall)
    • ENVIRON 761 Geospatial Analysis for Conservation Management (4 c.h., spring)
    • ENVIRON 765 Geospatial Analysis for Coastal and Marine Management (4 c.h., spring)
    • ENVIRON 768 GIS for Water Quantity and Quality Assessment (3 c.h., spring)
    • ENVIRON 771 GIS Field Skills (2 c.h., spring)
    • ENVIRON 589 Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment (3 c.h., spring)
    • ENVIRON 756 Qualitative Research Methods (3 c.h., fall)
    • ENVIRON 795 Hydrology Modeling for Water Quality and Quantity Assessment (3 c.h., fall)
    • EOS 590.02
    • PUBPOL 813 Quantitative Evaluation Methods (3 c.h., spring)
    • SOCIOL 720 Survey Research Methods (3 c.h., spring)
    • SOCIOL 722 Social Statistics I: Linear Models, Path Analy. & Struct. Eq. Sys.
    • SOCIOL 723 Social Statistics II: Discrete Multivariate Models

    Natural Science Electives
    Students must complete at least three courses in the natural sciences for a total of 9 credit hours minimum. These courses are intended to help you develop skills related to the management of natural resources (e.g., water, energy, forest resources, tropical resources, coastal resources). Consult with your advisor to select a coherent set of resource electives that complement your previous training and make up any deficiencies.

    Courses satisfying the natural resource electives change often. Below is an example list of courses that EEP students frequently take as natural science electives. To count for this requirement, classes must be taught by a natural scientist and have primarily natural science content; management or policy classes taught by social scientists or with majority social science content do not count, even if the course is in the student’s topical area of interest.

    Energy

    • Energy and the Environment
    • Energy Energy Technology and Its Impact on the Environment
    • Energy Hydrocarbons:  Houston Field Trip
    • Energy Energy Systems Modeling
    • Energy Electric Power Markets
    • Energy Transportation and Energy
    • Energy Energy and the Environment in Existing Homes
    • Energy Approaches to the Low Carbon Economy
    • Energy Clean Energy
    • Energy Coal Combustion Products
    • Energy Water and Energy Nexus
    • Energy Petroleum Exploration
    • Energy Building Energy on Campus
    • Mineral Resources

    Water

    • Water Quality Health
    • Energy California Water Crisis
    • Energy Stormwater Science
    • Energy River Processes
    • Energy Ecology and Management of Streams and Rivers
    • Energy Water in Africa
    • Energy Urban Ecology
    • Energy Watershed Hydrology
    • Energy Hydrology Modeling for Water Quality and Quantity Assessment
    • Energy Coal Combustion Products
    • Energy International Water Resources
    • Energy Landscape Hydrology
    • Energy GIS for Water Quality and Quantity Assessments (advanced; best suited to students with previous exposure to topic)
    • Energy Remote Sensing in Hydrology (advanced; best suited to students with previous exposure to topic)
    • Energy Aquatic Geochemistry
    • Energy Hydrologic Data Analysis
    • Energy Water Resources, Finance and Planning

    Ecosystems/Conservation

    • Tropical Ecology
    • Energy Biogeochemistry
    • Energy Molecular Ecology
    • Energy Ecology and Conservation in Gabon
    • Energy Putting Ecosytem Markets into Practice
    • Energy Agriculture and Sustainability
    • Energy Wildlife Surveys
    • Energy Land Conservation in Practice
    • Energy Soil Resources
    • Energy Silviculture
    • Energy Silviculture Prescription
    • Energy Landscape Analysis and Management
    • Energy Ecology and Management of Streams and Rivers
    • Energy Western Field Trip
    • Energy Species Distribution Modeling
    • Energy Urban Ecology
    • Energy Conservation Biology
    • Energy Landscape Ecology
    • Energy Wetland Field Skills
    • Energy Wetland Ecology and Management
    • Energy Landscape Hydrology
    • Energy Advanced Topics in Wetlands Ecology and Management (advanced; best suited to students with previous exposure to topic)
    • Energy Geospatial Analysis for Conservation Management (advanced; best suited to students with previous exposure to topic)
    • Energy Topics in Genomic Science (advanced; best suited to students with previous exposure to topic)
    • Energy Ecologcl Div & Climate Change
    • Genomics of Microbial Diversity

    Marine Coastal

    • Federal Fisheries Management
    • Energy Fluid Dynamics
    • Energy Water Quality and Health
    • Energy Water Pollution
    • Energy Beach and Island Geologic Processes
    • Energy Waves, Beaches, Coastline Dynamics
    • Energy Geospatial Analysis for Coastal and Marine Management (advanced; best suited to students with previous exposure to topic)

    Environmental Health/Toxicology

    • Water Quality Health
    • Energy Environmental Health
    • Energy Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment
    • Energy Population/Environment Dynamics and Health
    • Energy Air Pollution:  From Sources to Health Effects
    • Energy Focused Topics in Environmental Toxicology*
    • Energy Mechanisms for Environmental Toxicology*
    • Energy Environmental Toxicology*
    • Energy Chemical Fate of Organic Compounds*
    • Energy Environmental Aquatic Chemistry*
    • Energy Environmental Exposure Analysis*
    • Energy Air Quality: Human Exposure and Human Effects
    • Chem Transform of Env Contam

    *Note: Advanced; best suited to students with previous exposure to topic)

    Forestry

    • Forest Ecosystems
    • Energy Silviculture
    • Energy Silviculture Prescription
    • Energy Soil Resources
    • Energy Duke Forest Practicum
    • Energy Tree Structure and Function
    • Energy Forest Measurements
    • Energy Forests in the Public Interest

    Climate Change

    • Climate Change
    • Energy Biogeochemistry
    • Energy Changing Atmosphere
    • Energy Climate and Society
    • Energy Approaches to the Low Carbon Economy
    • Energy The Climate System
    • Energy Ecologcl Div & Climate Change

    Air Resources

    • Air Pollution:  From Sources to Health Effects
    • Energy Air Quality Management
    • Energy Air Quality: Human Exposure and Human Effects