Registration

The fall semester at the Marine Lab is space limited; students who are interested in registering for the fall 2020 semester, should contact Katie Wood for approval prior to registration. Students attending the Duke Marine Lab in person will travel to Duke University in Durham on August 10 or 11 for COVID-19 testing and will continue to the Marine Lab upon receiving a negative test result. Residential Information will be provided by Assistant Dean for Residential Life, Stephanie Klein (stephanie.klein@duke.edu).

    Fall 2020 Courses

    For semester date details, see the Marine Lab Academic Calendar.

    Download the Fall 2020 Course Schedule – Undergraduate (PDF)

    Download the Fall 2020 Course Time Table with T-reqs (PDF)

    Download the Fall 2020 Research Independent Study Options (PDF)

    Undergraduate courses at Duke University and the Marine Lab are being offered in three formats: 

    • In Person Indicates that a course is being offered in person, but will have spots for online participation. Online accommodations can be made for students who are registered for in-person courses as needed. 
    • Hybrid: Includes both in-person and online meetings. Because the course has at least one in-person component, an enrolled student must be physically on campus to enroll.
    • Online: All course material will be available online in a synchronous or asynchronous format. 

    BIOLOGY 273LA. / ENV 273LA. / EOS 374 LA. MARINE ECOLOGY - In Person*

    • Instructor: Joe Morton
    • Curriculum Code: NS, R, W
    • Credit: 1.0 course (4 semester hours)
    • Course Travel?: No – In the fall, this course is taught in Beaufort (i.e., not a travel course like the spring course)
    • Cross Listing: ENVIRON 273LA; EOS 374LA
    • Prerequisites: AP biology, introductory biology or instructor consent

    Factors that influence the distribution, abundance, and diversity of marine organisms. Course structure integrates lectures, field excursions, lab exercises and an independent project. Lecture topics include physical characteristics of marine systems, adaptation to environment, species interactions, biogeography, larval recruitment, and biodiversity and conservation of communities found in rocky shores, tidal flats, beaches, marshes, mangrove, coral reefs, and subtidal areas.

    BIOLOGY 293. RESEARCH INDEPENDENT STUDY

    • Curriculum Code: R
    • Credit: 1.0 course (3 semester hours)
    • Course Travel?: No

    Individual research in a field of special interest, under the supervision of a faculty member, the major product of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Open to all qualified students with consent of supervising instructor and director of undergraduate studies. May be repeated. Continued in Biology 493.

    BIOLOGY 373LA. / ENV 373LA. / NEUROSCIENCE 381LA. SENSORY PHYSIOLOGY OF MARINE ANIMALS - Online

    • Instructor: Daniel Rittschof
    • Curriculum Code: NS, R, W
    • Credit: 1.0 course (4 semester hours)
    • Course Travel?: No
    • Cross Listing: ENV 373LA, NEUROSCIENCE 381LA
    • Prerequisites: Credit for AP Biology or introductory biology (email ritt@duke.edu if you don't have intro biology experience).

    Sensory physiological principles with emphasis on visual and chemical cues. Laboratories will use behavior to measure physiological processes.

    BIOLOGY 376A. / ENV 376A. MARINE MAMMALS In Person*

    • Instructor: Andrew J. Read
    • Curriculum Code: NS, STS
    • Credit: 1.0 course (3 semester hours)
    • Course Travel?: No
    • Cross Listing: ENVIRON 376A
    • Prerequisites: AP Biology, introductory biology, or permission of instructor.

    The biology of cetaceans, pinnipeds, sirenians, and sea otters. Topics covered include the diversity, evolution, ecology, and behavior of marine mammals and their interactions with humans. Detailed consideration given to the adaptations that allow these mammals to live in the sea. Evaluation of the scientific, ethical, and aesthetic factors influencing societal attitudes toward these animals and of their conservation management in light of domestic legislation and international treaties.

    BIOLOGY 377LA. / ENV 377LA. / EOS 377LA. BIODIVERSITY OF MARINE INVERTEBRATES - In Person Only*

    • Instructor: Cindy Van Dover (Fall section)
    • Curriculum Code: NS, R
    • Credit: 1.0 course (4 semester hours)
    • Course Travel?: No
    • Cross Listing: ENVIRON 377LA, EOS 377LA
    • Prerequisites: AP Biology, introductory biology, or permission of instructor.

    Structure, function, and development of invertebrates collected from estuarine and marine habitats. In this course, we will explore biodiversity through explorations of marine invertebrate life. Emphasis will be placed on relationships between form and function, phylogeny, adaptations to the abiotic and biotic environment, animal ecology and experimental and modeling approaches to behavioral and ecological questions. Half of the day will be spent in the field and laboratories, while the other half will be spent in the field collecting, observing and studying organisms. Both ecological and evolutionary theory will unite the course. Not open to students who have taken Biology 777LA.

    This course fulfills the diversity requirement for Duke Biology majors. This course fulfills the Organismal Structure/Function requirement for the Environmental Science majors (BS) and the marine science section for Environmental Science majors (AB).

    BIOLOGY 493. RESEARCH INDEPENDENT STUDY

    • Curriculum Code: R
    • Credit: 1.0 course (3 semester hours)
    • Course Travel?: No

    Continuation of Biology 293.

    ENVIRON 286A. / PUBPOL 281A. MARINE POLICY In Person*

    • Instructor: Grant Murray
    • Curriculum Code: EI, SS, STS
    • Credit: 1.0 course or 3 units (3 semester hours)
    • Course Travel?: No
    • Cross Listing: PUBPOL 281A

    Policy and policy-making concerning the coastal marine environment. History of marine-related organizations, legislation, and issues and their effects on local, regional, national, and international arenas. Use of theoretical and methodological perspectives, including political science, sociology, and economics.

    ENVIRON 319A. AQUACULTURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT - Hybrid

    • Instructor: Zackary Johnson
    • Curriculum Code: NS, STS, W
    • Credit: 1.0 course (3 credit/semester hours)
    • Course Travel?: No

    The major environmental, social and economic drivers of increasing global aquaculture, with a focus on marine systems. Quantitative evaluation and comparison of the range of species for aquaculture, locations where operations occur, operational aspects including environmental impacts and management considerations.  Investigation of alternative approaches and potential future areas for aquaculture expansion as well as social, economic and technical barriers to implementation.  

    ENVIRON 393A. / EOS 393A. RESEARCH INDEPENDENT STUDY

    • Curriculum Code: R
    • Credit: 1.0 course (3 semester hours)
    • Course Travel?: No

    Individual research in a field of special interest, under the supervision of a faculty member, the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Open to students with approval of a research advisor at the Marine Lab. Students will be given a permission number after consent from the faculty who will serve as the student's research advisor.

    ENVIRON 394A. RESEARCH INDEPENDENT STUDY

    • Curriculum Code: R
    • Credit: 1.0 course (3 semester hours)
    • Course Travel?: No

    Continuation of ENVIRON 393.

    ENVIRON 309A. / GLHLTH 309A / BIO 309A. OCEANS IN HUMAN AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH - Hybrid

    • Instructor: Dana Hunt
    • Curriculum Code: NS, STS
    • Credit: 1.0 course (3 credit/semester hours)
    • Course Travel?: No
    • Cross Listing: BIO 309A, GLHLTH 309A

    Focus on the concept of “One Health” that the health of the environment and the people who live in it are linked.  The basis (from a biological perspective) of threats facing the marine environment and interactions between environmental and human health and their role in global health disparities.  For example, in discussing fisheries and aquaculture, the course will cover environmental impacts of these extractive industries and their importance in human and societal well-being.  This course will embrace immersive field experiences in North Carolina that will contextualize classroom learning and develop connections with practitioners and residents. Taught in Beaufort at the Duke Marine Lab.

    ENVIRON 445. MARINE CLIMATE CHANGE - Online

    • Instructor: David Johnston
    • Curriculum Code: EI, NS, STS
    • Credit: 1.0 course (3 credit/semester hours)
    • Course Travel?: No
    • Cross Listing: PUBPOL 445A, BIO 445A

    Explore the science of climate change with a focus on climate change impacts on marine ecosystems and inhabitants - specifically ocean acidification, warming and sea level rise. Students will learn about factors causing climate change, and how those vary spatially. The class will critically examine climate change modeling using EdGCM (a research-grade Global Climate Model with a user-friendly interface that can be run on a desktop computer), focusing on how scientists use models, observations and theory to make predictions about future climate and the assumptions and uncertainty implicit in this modeling. The course will also address climate-sensitive Polar ecosystems and marine mammal populations, which may be specifically impacted by climate change. In addition to ecosystem impacts of climate change, this course will discuss potential human impacts including the consequences of sea level rise and potential increases in disease due to climate changes.

     

    Quick Links

    Questions?

    For help with undergraduate course registration, email gwendy.womble@duke.edu.