Objective

We strive to give EE students:

  • A broad perspective on the current energy system and future alternatives
  • A fundamental understanding of science and technology as they relate to energy and the environment
  • Background in the economics, policy, and business of energy
  • First-hand exposure to the energy sector and energy leaders
  • Critical skills in data analysis and modeling
  • Experience with communication, facilitation, project management and teamwork

Vision

We train our students to become expert problem solvers with the interdisciplinary knowledge and skills needed to lead the transition to a more sustainable energy future. Students enjoy a small class size and low student-faculty ratio as they learn to serve as honest brokers of information, and work collaboratively with a wide range of professionals to implement practical solutions to energy and environmental concerns.

Transferable Skills

Energy & Environment students receive in-depth training in:

  • Energy system design and analysis
  • Energy technology, policy and economic evaluation
  • Energy finance
  • Decision models and methods for the energy sector (data analytics, optimization, simulation)
  • Power market modeling
  • Environmental impact assessment and sustainable energy solution design

Your Future

EE alumni career paths are as diverse as our students. The Nicholas School’s dedicated Career Center helps our graduates find fulfilling positions in a range of sectors and roles, including enabling private-sector firms to think strategically about trends in science, technology, and policy; helping government and advocacy groups design and implement new programs; and working with regulatory and research groups to assess policy compliance and effectiveness.

Curriculum

Through our required and elective courses, you’ll learn how the current energy system operates and develop an ability to critically evaluate future energy alternatives. You’ll acquire an understanding of the economic, regulatory and behavioral levers of change and how they interact to enable or constrain progress, and gain experience using cutting-edge analytical tools and energy modeling frameworks so you can drive change in a variety of roles or organizations.

Our curriculum leaves room for you to customize your studies to meet your career goals, whether they involve business strategy, policy development, or energy system design. Your faculty advisor will work with you to select courses that align with your interests.

Prerequisites

PrerequisiteS

See Master of Environmental Management degree prerequisites.

ADDITIONAL PREREQUISITES FOR EE STUDENTS

One semester of college-level microeconomics. Alternatively, this requirement can be fulfilled with one semester of introductory economics, if your course had a focus on micro rather than macroeconomics.

Courses & Requirements

GENERAL

In addition to the MEM degree requirements, a typical EE curriculum consists of the following components:

  • 4 courses/tutorials required for all MEM students (6-8 credit hours)
  • 1 Core Course (3 credit hours minimum)
  • 2 Science & Technology Courses (6 credit hours minimum)
  • 3 Markets & Policy Courses (6 credit hours minimum)
  • 3 Tools Courses (9 credit hours minimum)
  • 2 Energy Electives (6 credit hours minimum)
  • Master’s Project (4-6 credit hours)
  • Additional electives to meet the 48-credit hour minimum for degree completion

Requirements for All MEM Students

All MEM students must take the following courses:

REQUIRED FOR EE PROGRAM

Courses supporting the EE program are taught within the Nicholas School, at several other departments at Duke, and at UNC-Chapel Hill and NCSU. This list of example courses is not exhaustive; see the Courses section for the current list of available courses.

Core Course (select 3 credit hours)

All students are required to take the following course (preferably in their first semester):

  • ENVIRON 711 Energy and the Environment (3 credit hours, fall)

Science & Technology Courses (select 6 credit hours)

All students are required to take the following course (preferably in their second semester):
ENVIRON 631 Energy Tech. & its Impact on the Environ. (3 credit hours, spring)

Students are required to take at least one of the following courses:

  • BIOLOGY 560  Ecology and Global Change
  • CEE 690.03   Air Pollution Engineering
  • ENVIRON 501 Environmental Toxicology
  • ENVIRON 529  Changing Atmosphere
  • ENVIRON 536  Water Quality Management
  • ENVIRON 552 Climate and Society
  • ENVIRON 564 Biogeochemistry
  • ENVIRON 603  Air Quality: Management
  • ENVIRON 604  Air Quality: Human Exposure and Health
  • ENVIRON 624  Agriculture and Sustainability
  • ENVIRON 714   Landscape Ecology
  • EOS 511 The Climate System
  • EOS 512  Climate Change
  • EOS 524  Water Quality Health
  • EOS 525   Water Pollution
  • EOS 729   Water-Energy Nexus

Other courses that look at the impact of energy-related activities on ecosystems, air quality, water, and climate may also qualify for this category.

Markets & Policy (select 6 credit hours)

All students are required to take the following 2 half-semester courses (preferably in their first semester):

  • ENVIRON 520 Resource & Environmental Economics I (1.5 credit hours, fall)
  • ENVIRON 635 Energy Economics and Policy (1.5 credit hours, fall)

In addition, students are required to take at least one of the following courses (3 credits):

  • EGRMGMT 574   Commercializing Technology Innovations
  • ENERGY 620  Energy Finance
  • ENERGY 727   Energy Law
  • ENRGYENV 625  Energy, Markets, and Innovation
  • ENRGYENV 627 Business Strategy for Sustainability
  • ENVIRON 521 Resource & Environmental Economics II
  • ENVIRON 537  Environmental Health
  • ENVIRON 538  Global Environmental Health: Econ and Policy
  • ENVIRON 563  Cost-Benefit Analysis/Health and Environment
  • ENVIRON 577  Environmental Politics
  • ENVIRON 583  Energy and US National Security
  • ENVIRON 590.75  Applied Env Policy Entrepreneurship
  • ENVIRON 590.84   Env Entrepreneurship Finance
  • ENVIRON 603  Air Quality: Management
  • ENVIRON 604  Air Quality: Human Exposure and Health
  • ENVIRON 640  Climate Change Economics & Policy
  • ENVIRON 717  Markets for Electric Power
  • ENVIRON 752  Sustainability and Renewable Resource Economics
  • ENVIRON 782  Foundations of Environmental Entrepreneurship
  • ENVIRON 790.02  Intro to Environmental Finance
  • ENVIRON 790.03   Clean Energy Finance
  • ENVIRON 826  Global Environmental Politics
  • ENVIRON 831  Sustainable Business Strategy
  • ENVIRON 835  Environmental Law
  • ENVIRON 855   International Environmental Law
  • LAW 520  Climate Change and the Law
  • MARKETING 898  Irrational Choices, Unconscious Decisions and Market Failure
  • PUBPOL 790.10   International Energy Systems and Sustainable Development
  • PUBPOL 811  Microeconomics: Policy Applications

Other courses that address legal, political, or economic subjects may also qualify for this category.

Tools Courses (select 9 credit hours)

All students are required to take the following two courses (preferably in their first semester):

  • ENVIRON 710 Applied Data Analysis for Environ Science (3 credit hours, fall)
  • ENVIRON 716 Modeling for Energy Systems (3 credit hours, fall)

In addition, students are required to take at least one of the following courses:

  • DECISION 614  Forecasting
  • EGRMGMT 530 Finance in High Tech Industries
  • EGRMGMT 532 Adv Corporate Finance for Technology Based Companies
  • EGRMGMT 560  Project Management
  • EGRMGMT 580  Decision Models
  • EGRMGMT 590.05  Fundamentals of Data Science
  • ENERGY 590.01  Intro Data Sci Machine Learning
  • ENERGY 620   Energy Finance
  • ENRGYENV 626  Modeling and Analysis for Env Sustainability
  • ENVIRON 531  Econ Analysis of Resource and Env Policies
  • ENVIRON 532   Evaluation of Public Expenditures
  • ENVIRON 557  Social Science Surveys for Env Mgmt
  • ENVIRON 559  Fundamentals of GIS and Geospatial Analysis
  • ENVIRON 638  Environmental Life Cycle Assessment
  • ENVIRON 658  Applied Qualitative Research Methods
  • ENVIRON 755  Community Based Environmental Management
  • ENVIRON 790.02  Intro to Environmental Finance
  • ENVIRON 790.03  Clean Energy Finance
  • ENVIRON 790.05  Economics of Modern Power Systems
  • ENVIRON 790.30  Time Series Analysis for Energy Data
  • ENVIRON 832  Environmental Decision Analysis
  • ENVIRON 850  Program Evaluation of Environ Policies
  • PUBPOL 811 Microeconomics: Policy Applications
  • PUBPOL 813 Quantitative Evaluation Methods

Other courses that provide experience with analytical tools and decision frameworks may also qualify for this category.

Energy Electives (select 6 credit hours)

Offerings may change, depending on instructor availability and student interest.  See http://energy.duke.edu/education/energy-courses for a listing of current energy-related classes.  Note that many of the energy-related courses at Duke have an ENERGY cross-listing in ACES.  Students may count up to 3 one-credit hour courses towards the energy elective requirement.

A total of 6 credit hours of energy electives are required from the following:

  • ENERGY 590.1.01   Introduction to Renewable Project Develop
  • ENERGY 620  Energy Finance
  • ENERGY 727   Energy Law
  • ENERGY 790.01  Energy Policy Analysis and Writing
  • ENERGY 790.02  Renewables and the World’s Poor
  • ENERGY 790.03   Trans of US Elec Power Sector
  • ENRGYEGR 490.02    Modern Power Systems
  • ENRGYENV 625  Energy, Markets, and Innovation
  • ENRGYENV 626  Modeling and Analysis for Env Sustainability
  • ENRGYENV 627   Business Strategy for Sustainability
  • ENRGYENV 898   EDGE Seminar Series
  • ENVIRON 552  Climate and Society
  • ENVIRON 559  Fundamentals of GIS and Geospatial Analysis
  • ENVIRON 583  Energy and US National Security
  • ENVIRON 590.37  Sustainable Cities and Urban Design
  • ENVIRON 590.51   Petroleum Exploration
  • ENVIRON 593.12   Energy of Geopolitics
  • ENVIRON 603  Air Quality: Management
  • ENVIRON 604  Air Quality: Human Exposure and Health
  • ENVIRON 630   Transportation and Energy
  • ENVIRON 638   Environmental Life Cycle Assessment
  • ENVIRON 640   Climate Change Economics & Policy
  • ENVIRON 713A  California Clean Energy Field Trip
  • ENVIRON 717   Markets for Electric Power
  • ENVIRON 762   Environmental Megatrends
  • ENVIRON 763  Forest Management Seminar (Biomass)
  • ENVIRON 790.02   Intro to Environmental Finance
  • ENVIRON 790.03   Clean Energy Finance
  • ENVIRON 790.05   Economics of Modern Power Systems
  • ENVIRON 790.30   Time Series Analysis for Energy Data
  • ENVIRON 811   Business and Environment
  • ENVIRON 830   Building Energy on Campus
  • EOS 792  Microgrid Seminar
  • PUBPOL 590.03  Economics of Energy and Development

Other courses that address energy technology, science, policy, and economics may also qualify for this category with academic advisor approval.

Free Electives (select 10-12 credit hours)

Students may select any additional courses that satisfy the guidelines set by the Nicholas School. Many EE students opt to take additional energy electives to fulfill their MEM program credit hours requirements. 

SEE ALL COURSES

For Current & Admitted Students

Course Planning Worksheets

Master's Projects

A Master’s Project combines the academic rigor of a thesis with the practical experience of an internship. Working singly or in groups, students apply skills and knowledge they’ve acquired in the classroom to tackle real-world environmental challenges for real clients through a well-formulated and defensible analysis. The MP typically culminates in a paper and presentation in the program’s final semester. It fulfills 4-6 credit hours. The EE program requires a business-sponsored MP with specific consulting components detailed to you when you start your second year.

 

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